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Category Archives: Weather Warning

 

Tipperary County Council Crisis Management Team reconvened at 1.30pm to review the flood situation in the lower River Suir catchment area.

The immediate high flooding risk has abated in Clonmel, Cahir, Ardfinnan and Kilsheelan. Normal January weather conditions are expected over the next few days and the situation will continue to be closely monitored by the Clonmel Flood Response Team.

Kilganey residents are being advised that they can now return home and arrangements are in place to facilitate this.

Additional mobile pumps continue to be deployed to manage the water levels on the North Quay, Carrick on Suir which are currently clear of water but remain closed to traffic.

The Council will continue to provide daily updates on its website and through local media for the remainder of the week.

Ger Walsh
Corporate Services
Tipperary County Council


 

Tipperary County Council Crisis Management Team reconvened at 7.30am to assess the flood situation in the lower River Suir catchment area.

In relation to Clonmel, Cahir, Ardfinnan and Kilsheelan, the River level is continuing to stabilise and the overnight rainfall has not materialised to the level initially anticipated. The situation will continue to be monitored on an hourly basis given the forecast for the next 24 hours.

In relation to Carrick-on-Suir, there is an ongoing issue on the North Quay and additional mobile pumps are being deployed to manage the water levels at this location.

A further update will issue at lunchtime.
Ger Walsh
Corporate Services
Tipperary County Council


Tipperary County Council Crisis Management Team reconvened at 5am to assess the situation. There has been no significant change in the river level since the last update at 2am.
The situation will continue to be monitored on an hourly basis and a further update will be provided following the next meeting of the Crisis Management Team at 7.30am.
Ger Walsh
Corporate Services
Tipperary County Council


The Road Safety Authority (RSA), is asking road users to exercise caution while using the roads, as Met Éireann have issued an orange weather warning of strong winds for Leitrim, Sligo, Clare, Cork, Kerry and Limerick from Friday morning until  Saturday evening. Southwesterly winds reaching mean speeds of 65 to 80 km/h and gusts of 110 to 130 km/h likely. High ground and exposed coasts will be most at risk.  A forecast of strong and gusty winds with mean speeds of 55 to 75 km/hr with gusts of 85 to 100 km/hr have also been issued to counties Galway, Mayo and Donegal for the same period.

The RSA is asking road users to take extra care in these strong winds and have issued the following advice:

*   Beware of objects being blown out onto the road. Expect the unexpected. Watch out for falling/fallen debris on the road and vehicles veering across the road
*   Control of a vehicle may be affected by strong cross winds. High sided vehicles and motorcyclists are particularly vulnerable to strong winds

*   Allow extra space between you and vulnerable road users such as cyclists and motorcyclists
*   Drive with dipped headlights at all times
*   Monitor radio weather broadcasts while travelling

Advice to Pedestrians & Cyclists;

*   Be seen. Wear bright clothing with reflective armbands or a reflective belt
*   Take extra care when crossing the road or cycling in extremely windy conditions as a sudden gust of wind could blow you into the path of an oncoming vehicle.
*   Walk on a footpath, not in the street. Walk on the right hand side of the road, facing traffic if there are no footpaths.

For advice on severe weather driving tips please see severe weather advice<http://www.rsa.ie/RSA/Road-Safety/Campaigns/Current-road-safety-campaigns/Severe-Weather-Advice/> on the RSA website or check out the RSA Facebook and Twitter pages.
For more weather updates visit Met Eireann’s website www.met.ie<http://www.met.ie/>

For further information please contact:
Communications Department, Road Safety Authority – 096 25008


The Road Safety Authority (RSA) is advising all road users to take extreme care when using the roads over the coming days as Met Éireann has issued an orange weather alert warning of further wintry showers this evening, overnight and on Tuesday of rain, hail, sleet and snow.  Accumulations of greater than 3 cm are possible even on lower ground with thunderstorms too. Widespread frosty and icy conditions will develop.

The RSA also advises road users to:

·         Check local and National weather forecasts before setting out on a journey. Clear your windows and mirrors before you set out, carry a screen scraper and de-icer. Do not use hot water on the windscreen as it can crack the glass.

·         Remove ALL snow from your vehicle before commencing your journey. Snow left on the roof will become loose and can drop onto the windscreen during braking, thereby causing sudden and severe restriction to your vision. It can also fall off during your drive and cause injury to pedestrians or a reflex action by another driver.

·         In snow and icy conditions manoeuvre gently, slow down and leave extra distance between you and the vehicle in front. Too much steering is bad and avoid harsh braking and acceleration. Use the highest gear possible to avoid wheel spin. Select a low gear when travelling downhill especially if through bends.

·         Remember that heavy snowfall and rain reduce visibility. Use dipped headlights and decrease speed smoothly.

·         Do not drive on the tail-lights of the vehicle in front (Target Fixing). This can give a false sense of security and you will be too close to be able to brake safely.

·         Watch out for “black ice.” If the road looks polished or glossy it could be, black ice” one of winter’s worst hazards: Black Ice is difficult to see! It is nearly transparent ice that often looks like a harmless puddle or is overlooked entirely. It can occur especially in sheltered / shaded areas on roads, under trees and adjacent to high walls.

·         Use your dipped headlights so that others will see you. Make sure your headlights and taillights are all in working order, replace broken bulbs.

·         Watch out for vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists and allow extra space.

·         Check tyres, including spare wheel, replace them if the tread depth falls below 3mm and make sure they are inflated to the correct tyre pressure. Lack of grip can occur even on treated roads so drive slowly in the highest gear possible, manoeuvre gently and avoid harsh braking

·         Beware of objects being blown out onto the road and to expect the unexpected. In particular watch out for falling/fallen debris on the road and vehicles veering across the road. Control of a vehicle may be affected by strong cross winds. High sided vehicles and motorcyclists are particularly vulnerable to strong winds.

Pedestrians should take extra care when crossing the road or cycling in windy showers and during spells of hail, sleet and snow.

·         Pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists are advised to be seen. Wear bright clothing with reflective armbands or a reflective belt.

·         If a journey cannot be avoided walk on a footpath, not in the street. If there are no footpaths walk on the right hand side of the road (towards oncoming traffic). Be extremely careful as frost, ice and snow will make walking on footpaths very dangerous.

·         Remember that footpaths may not be treated so walk with extreme care, make sure you are wearing appropriate footwear and in extreme conditions consider an appropriate walking stick or walking pole. While walking on footpaths and in public places, or entering and exiting your vehicle, DO NOT underestimate the danger of ice.

·         Avoid walking in the streets at all costs if possible. Remember, cars and trucks slip and slide, too!  If it’s an emergency, and you can’t avoid the street, wear bright or reflective clothing.

·         Visibility is reduced in snowy condition so wear high visibility clothing or carry a torch

·         Wear clothing that does not restrict your vision. Stay warm, but DO NOT impair your vision with hoodies, ski masks, scarves, hats, etc. This type of clothing could prevent you from spotting icy conditions that may lead to a fall or not enable you to see a car that is spinning out of control.

·         Snow and ice cause havoc quickly, so use extra caution when crossing roadways, and always cross at pedestrian crossings.

·         Ice can easily hide under a light dusting of snow. Just because you don’t see the ice doesn’t mean it’s not there waiting for your unsuspecting footfalls.

·         If you can’t avoid the ice and snow, bend your knees slightly and take slower, shorter steps to help reduce the chance of a slip and fall and an injury.

·         If forced to use the steps at someone’s home, apartment, or other public building, walk slow and take shorter steps when descending. The same is true of driveways and other hilly terrain; these areas can be very dangerous when they become slippery with ice or snow. Steps especially can be hard to clear and build up ice easily.

·         Many slips and falls happen in places people regard as safe and secure, typically outside their front door, on the door step, on the path or while getting out of the car. It is very possible that a thin sheet of transparent ice or “Black Ice” is covering your pathway putting you at risk

For advice on severe weather driving tips please see severe weather advice<http://www.rsa.ie/RSA/Road-Safety/Campaigns/Current-road-safety-campaigns/Severe-Weather-Advice/> on the RSA website or check out the RSA Facebook and Twitter pages.

For more weather updates visit Met Eireann’s website www.met.ie<http://www.met.ie/>

For further information contact;
RSA Communications department 096-25008


The Road Safety Authority (RSA) is advising all road users to take extreme care when using the roads this weekend as Met Éireann has issued an orange weather alert warning of extreme winds from Saturday afternoonthrough to early Sunday morning.
South-westerly winds veering West with mean speeds of 65 to 80km/h reaching gusts of 110 km/h and130km/h, in exposed coasts and headlands for a time on Saturday evening and early night. There will be high seas and some high tides and coastal flooding is possible.

The RSA also advises road users to:

·         Beware of objects being blown out onto the road and to expect the unexpected. In particular watch out for falling/fallen debris on the road and vehicles veering across the road. Control of a vehicle may be affected by strong cross winds. High sided vehicles and motorcyclists are particularly vulnerable to strong winds.

·         Drivers should allow extra space around vulnerable road users such as cyclists and motorcyclists as they may be blown off course by strong winds.

·         Watch out for vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists.

·         Use dipped headlights at all times of poor visibility not parking/side lights and fog lights.

·         Road users should always follow recommended routes and obey signs closing roads to traffic.

Pedestrians should take extra care when crossing the road or cycling in extremely windy conditions as a sudden gust of wind could blow you into the path of an oncoming vehicle.

·         Pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists are advised to be seen. Wear bright clothing with reflective armbands or a reflective belt.

·         Pedestrians should walk on a footpath, not in the street. Walk on the right hand side of the road, facing traffic if there are no footpaths.

For advice on severe weather driving tips please see severe weather advice<http://www.rsa.ie/RSA/Road-Safety/Campaigns/Current-road-safety-campaigns/Severe-Weather-Advice/> on the RSA website or check out the RSA Facebook and Twitter pages.

For more weather updates visit Met Eireann’s website www.met.ie<http://www.met.ie/>

For further information contact;
RSA Communications department 096-25008

Communications Department| Road Safety Authority | Moy Valley Business Park, Primrose Hill, Dublin Road, Ballina, Co. Mayo | Dir 096 25008 | www.rsa.ie<http://www.rsa.ie/>


The Road Safety Authority (RSA) is advising all road users to take extra care when using the roads as Met Eireann has issued a yellow weather warning nationwide from tonight until Thursday evening. Showers will turn wintry tonight in the north and west, with a risk of icy patches. Wintry showers will bring snow accumulations of up to 3 cm at lower levels during tomorrow and through Thursday, with all areas at risk. Showers will be most frequent in the west and north and over hills and mountains with higher accumulations expected there. Wednesday night will be extremely cold and will be well below freezing with frost and ice making for hazardous driving conditions.

The RSA has issued the following advice:

· Check local and National weather forecasts before setting out on a journey. Clear your windows and mirrors before you set out, carry a screen scraper and de-icer. Do not use hot water on the windscreen as it can crack the glass.

· Remove ALL snow from your vehicle before commencing your journey. Snow left on the roof will become loose and can drop onto the windscreen during braking, thereby causing sudden and severe restriction to your vision. It can also fall off during your drive and cause injury to pedestrians or a reflex action by another driver.

· In snow and icy conditions manoeuvre gently, slow down and leave extra distance between you and the vehicle in front. Too much steering is bad and avoid harsh braking and acceleration. Use the highest gear possible to avoid wheel spin. Select a low gear when travelling downhill especially if through bends.

· Remember that heavy snowfall and rain reduce visibility. Use dipped headlights and decrease speed smoothly.

· To prevent windscreen wipers from freezing and seizing up in freezing fog, add anti-freeze screen washer to the water tank. Check that the wipers for wear and tear and replace them if they are.

· Do not drive on the tail-lights of the vehicle in front (Target Fixing). This can give a false sense of security and you will be too close to be able to brake safely. In heavy fog, turn off your radio and let down your driver’s window a fraction, so as you can hear other traffic.

Watch out for “black ice.” If the road looks polished or glossy it could be, black ice” one of winter’s worst hazards: Black Ice is difficult to see! It is nearly transparent ice that often looks like a harmless puddle or is overlooked entirely. It can occur especially in sheltered / shaded areas on roads, under trees and adjacent to high walls.

· Use your dipped headlights so that others will see you. Make sure your headlights and taillights are all in working order, replace broken bulbs.

· Watch out for vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists and allow extra space.

· Check tyres, including spare wheel, replace them if the tread depth falls below 3mm and make sure they are inflated to the correct tyre pressure. Lack of grip can occur even on treated roads so drive slowly in the highest gear possible, manoeuvre gently and avoid harsh braking.

Pedestrians and cyclists are advised to;

· While walking on footpaths and in public places, or entering and exiting your vehicle, DO NOT underestimate the danger of ice.

· Many slips and falls happen in places people regard as safe and secure, typically outside their front door, on the door step, on the path or while getting out of the car. It is very possible that a thin sheet of transparent ice or “Black Ice” is covering your pathway putting you at risk. When you approach a footpath or roadway that appears to be covered with ice, always use extreme caution.

For further information please contact:
RSA Communications Department – 096 25008

Follow the RSA on Facebook and Twitter
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RSAIreland
Twitter: https://twitter.com/RSAIreland​



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