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Category Archives: Health

It is disgraceful that parents had to take to the airwaves to demand that the decision to cut summer respite services for children with special needs run by the Brothers of Charity at St. Rita’s in Clonmel be reversed. I commend those parents, who have been superb advocates for their children and for the disability family. The Minister of State will know that they are under pressure on a daily basis, 365 days a year. They did not need the additional frustration, worry and annoyance of the past year. These parents are entitled to and due an apology.

For years, those parents and we as TDs called for Summer respite services. Thankfully, that was eventually established in 2018, and last year’s Summer camp was professionally run, hugely successful and very valuable to both the children and the parents. Some 20 families were supported at very reasonable costs. Parent power has now saved that Summer camp. I again commend the parents for the campaign they have launched over the past week on the radio and by contacting their public representatives and the wider public.

Today I asked the Minister of State Finian McGrath to explain the exact situation in relation to this year’s Summer camp. I asked had the decision to cut this service been fully reversed? Have the Brothers of Charity been notified of this decision? Will the same level of service be available this year as last year? Will the same level of funding be available this year as last year?

Minister McGrath stated in part of his reply that the South East Community Healthcare, SECH, provides children’s respite services in two locations in south Tipperary including the Brothers of Charity camp in St. Rita’s respite services. In addition, SECH provides outreach and home-based respite to children with challenges accessing centre-based respite for a number of reasons including those confined to home for complex medical reasons or difficulty socialising safely with other children as a result of emerging diagnosis and responsive behaviours. He stated that the HSE is fully committed to maintaining the same level of service this year as in 2018. The additional funding provided last year will continue in 2019 and, in particular, the €2 million allocation to be spent on alternative respite services remains a high priority for the HSE. SECH acknowledges the quality service provided by St. Rita’s and will ensure that the necessary resources required for the Summer respite programme in St. Rita’s will continue to be provided to the Brothers of Charity in 2019.

I welcome this reply from the Minister, particularly the statement he made that the necessary resources required for the Summer respite programme in St. Rita’s will continue to be provided to the Brothers of Charity in 2019. That will be a relief to parents. It is a pity it had to come to this and the turmoil parents have been put through over the past week. It should never have been allowed to happen and I certainly hope it will never happen again. I asked the Minister of State to confirm that this respite service will continue next year and into the future. This service is essential for children with special needs and their families.

The Minister stated that when he left the Chamber he would be asking who put the parents through this particular situation. He stated that he is very much aware of the importance of access to planned respite, which ensures that people with disabilities receive opportunities to socialise and facilitates families to receive a break from caring, to preserve the family unit and to provide stability. He added that he gave a commitment three years ago that he would reform the disability services, invest in them, and put the person at the centre of those services, that there was a need to expand those services and that was his objective.

I will as always continue to follow up and keep you updated.

 

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Nobody with a whit of common sense believes the Taoiseach, the Minister for Finance, Deputy Donohue, and indeed the Government were not aware of the national children’s hospital debacle.  It is in fact now crystal clear that the Minister for Health and the Minister for Finance were fully aware of the huge hospital overrun at the time of the last budget. The Minister for Finance had the chief Government procurement officer on the board of the hospital who was involved at all levels, including financial sub-committee level. The cover-up included confidentiality pledges to ensure the Government would not be formally or officially informed until after the budget. And why was that, that was because this Government wanted to continue to give huge tax concessions to the super-rich backers of this Government. 

There is no justification for the Government delaying health and other capital projects using the excuse of the cost overrun on the children’s hospital project. The hospitals serving my constituency of Tipperary, South Tipperary General Hospital and University Hospital Limerick, are the most overcrowded in the country. I want to tell the Minister for Health that no cancellation, no suspension, no long-fingering and no delaying of capital projects affecting Tipperary will be tolerated and I include in that the completion and opening of the 40-bed modular unit at South Tipperary General Hospital, the building of a new 50-bed unit at South Tipperary General Hospital, the building of a new 100-bed unit at St. Patrick’s Hospital in Cashel and the building of a 60-bed unit at University Hospital Limerick.

The Irish super-rich are dripping with wealth and gaining more by the day. The Government’s policy is not only not to tax the super-rich but also to give them tax concessions. The Government is in fact the politically extremist representative of the super-rich at the expense of citizens generally in this country. I believe the Government should bring forward an emergency budget to claw back the €250 million worth of tax concessions given to the super-rich in the last three budgets, and I include in that those given to the 25,700 individuals with incomes ranging from €200,000 and in excess of €2 million.

It is time for the Minister for Health to go and to take the Minister for Finance with him and give the public an opportunity to make a decision on this Government in a General Election. It is time for Fianna Fáil and the Independents who are supporting the Government, it’s time for Deputies Lowry and Cahill and other Independents to call it out on this issue and support the motion.


 

Earlier today Deputy Seamus Healy TD raised again in the Dáil at Leaders Questions with the Taoiseach the issue of the lack of adult inpatient psychiatric beds and the need for the provision of a properly resourced, properly funded and integrated mental health service in Tipperary with the Minister, He will as always keep you updated.


 

Priority Question 5. To ask the Minister for Health his plans to open adult inpatient psychiatric beds in County Tipperary; and if he will make a statement on the matter. [28609/18]

 

Séamus Healy (Tipperary, Workers and Unemployed Action Group)
This raises again the need for the provision of a properly resourced, properly funded and integrated mental health service for County Tipperary with particular reference to the need to reopen adult inpatient psychiatric beds wrongly closed at St. Michael’s unit in Clonmel in 2012.

 

Jim Daly (Cork South West, Fine Gael)  The provision of acute inpatient care to the adult population of north Tipperary, which is in CHO 3, is provided between the acute unit in University Hospital Limerick, which has 50 beds, and the acute psychiatric unit in Ennis, which has 39 beds.

The 44 bed department of psychiatry based at St Luke’s General Hospital, Kilkenny, is the designated approved centre for acute inpatient services for south Tipperary, which is in CHO 5. This enables all acute inpatient admissions for this CHO area to be managed at a single site. Referrals to St. Luke’s are through a consultant psychiatrist who makes the clinical decision to admit based on the level of acute presentation or need. In addition to the department of psychiatry, a dedicated psychiatric liaison team operates out of the emergency department in St. Luke’s. All service users presenting to the emergency department who require psychiatric assessment will receive that assessment within agreed timeframes in line with relevant guidelines. Onward referral pathways are agreed with all service users upon completion of psychiatric assessment in the emergency department. Pathways can include admission to an acute unit, referral to a relevant community mental health service team or referral back to a GP.

There are a range of other mental health services for adults in Tipperary. These include, for example, psychiatry of old age teams, non-acute beds, day hospitals and day centres. In addition, there are community mental health teams and high, medium and low-support community residences. In respect of those under 18, there are three CAMHS teams operating in Tipperary, one in north Tipperary and two in south Tipperary. The CAMHS acute units at Eist Linn in Cork and Merlin Park in Galway, which have a total of 42 beds, serve the Tipperary catchment area.

The HSE indicates that the south east community healthcare area has the second lowest rate of acute psychiatric bed provision. If this area were to be provided with the national average rate of bed provision, an additional 18 acute psychiatric care beds would be required. Evolving demographic pressures have recently led to over-occupancy at the departments of psychiatry at both St. Luke’s General Hospital Kilkenny and University Hospital Waterford.

The Deputy will be aware that I met local delegations on several occasions over recent months to discuss current and future provision of mental health services in Tipperary, including reviewing bed capacity. I also visited mental health facilities in south Tipperary in February last. Further to my correspondence of 11 May with the chief officer of CHO 5, the south east mental health service management team met a delegation of local representatives and discussed in detail all issues concerning the delivery of mental health services in Tipperary, including the potential for additional acute psychiatric beds across the south east community healthcare area. South east community healthcare mental health services has also engaged with HSE estates on the potential to develop psychiatric inpatient beds at the four acute hospital sites in the region.

I will continue to monitor the development of all mental health services in Tipperary, particularly in the context of progressing new service developments agreed under the HSE service plan and through additional investment for mental health provided by Government.

 

Séamus Healy (Tipperary, Workers and Unemployed Action Group)

I acknowledge the interest and involvement of the Minister of State in this issue since his appointment. As he said, he met representatives of the Save Our Acute Hospital Services Committee and Oireachtas Members on two occasions in Leinster House. He has visited the services in Clonmel and met all the stakeholders involved, including mental health service management in the south east. There is a serious and growing concern about the state of mental health services in the county, specifically that they are substandard and that there are no inpatient beds. A new umbrella organisation, Tipperary’s Fight for Mental Health Services, has been involved recently in public meetings and a public march on this issue. That organisation is supported by all the local Oireachtas Members and a large number of councillors as well. The Save Our Acute Hospital Services Committee has been engaging with mental health service management in the south east. At our most recent meeting, the management accepted that there was a shortage of beds in the south east and that Tipperary had a strong case for additional beds. They also indicated it would be helpful if the Minister of State was in a position to meet the negotiating team. Will he do that?

 

Jim Daly (Cork South West, Fine Gael)

The Deputy was present at the meeting with local Oireachtas representatives on 2 May and he has consistently been proactive on this issue. On 11 May, I wrote to the chief officer of CHO 5 outlining that there is a need to restore some acute bed provision for adults in Tipperary following the closure of St. Michael’s unit some years ago and given the consequent transport and access difficulties to St. Luke’s mental health unit in Kilkenny and to Ennis, which were highlighted to me. I emphasised the need for progress to construction as quickly as possible of the new respite crisis house in Clonmel to replace the existing facility there, including the provision of a construction date for that facility. I also highlighted the inadequate enhancement of community-based services since 2012 to compensate for the closure of St. Michael’s, particularly comparing the level of services envisaged by the HSE against what has been delivered, and referred to the inadequate staffing levels for both adult and CAMHS teams in Tipperary. I referred to the further issue of poor access to Eist Linn CAMHS unit in Cork, resulting in long stays for under-18s in adult health facilities in Tipperary, which has always been a concern of mine. The Deputy will be aware that I have spoken to a number of parents of children who have been left waiting in South Tipperary General Hospital, which is not appropriate or acceptable.

 

Séamus Healy (Tipperary, Workers and Unemployed Action Group)

The representatives of the Save Our Acute Hospital Services Committee have met mental health service management on three occasions. On the most recent occasion, they accepted that there is a need for additional beds in the area and that south Tipperary has a strong case. They also indicated that the Minister of State’s involvement at a future meeting would be helpful and I ask again if he would be prepared to do that. At this stage, we need action and political input at the highest level to move this issue forward.

 

I would be more than happy to continue the engagement I have had with the Deputy. I am concerned about the issues in south Tipperary and have a good understanding of them. I am awaiting a response from the chief officer of CHO 5. I asked my officials this week to follow up to ensure that I get a written response, which I expect to have in the next week or ten days. As soon as I have it, I will certainly be happy to engage further with the Deputy. There is potential in the development of the new 50-bed unit. I have asked HSE estates section to consider the provision of a number of those beds for mental health services without distorting the plans that are in progress. It should not create a delay. That is the route I am following and I will certainly meet with the Deputy, Oireachtas colleagues and whomever they want me to meet in Tipperary. My focus on working with the HSE and as soon as I receive a response from the chief officer, I will progress the issue.


 

Healy says people being failed by our Mental Health
System and calls for a big turn-out at Thursday’s
meeting in Clonmel’s Park Hotel.

During Leader’s Questions on Thursday 26 th of April
Deputy Healy said:

“Children with Mental Health difficulties and their
parents face immense challenges to get an adequate,
or indeed any, service. Due to this, many children carry
those difficulties into their adult lives.
The position would be much worse were it not for the
tremendous work done by community and voluntary
organisations across the country. There are many such
organisations in my own area, including the River Suir
Suicide Patrol, Taxi Watch and C-SAW, the community
suicide awareness workers. These all operate on a
voluntary, unpaid basis and do tremendous work.
There is huge frustration among these organisations,
which feel alone in dealing with issues that should be
properly dealt with by the public mental health service.
These organisations need to be acknowledged,
supported and resourced, along with financial support.

Press Statement on Mental Health

We are failing to provide for our young people. We
need to do so urgently, it must become a Government
priority. We cannot, should not, and hopefully, will not
kick the can further down the road in this. They need
to be implemented urgently not in the next budget but
now, because this is something that is affecting young
people on a minute by minute basis.

Children and young people are being failed by our
mental health system. For the past three months since
February, young people experiencing mental health
difficulties have been admitted to the paediatric ward
in South Tipperary General Hospital. Today, there are
three young people on the ward. There have been as
many as five and their lengths of stay have been as
long as eight weeks. The reason for this, as we all
know, is that there are simply not enough inpatient
beds for young people with mental health difficulties.

Admissions to the paediatric ward in South Tipperary
General Hospital are totally inappropriate.

Nursing staff do their best. They are kind,
compassionate and caring but they are not trained to

Press Statement on Mental Health

provide mental health care. Parents, usually mothers,
must stay on the ward overnight to give support to
their children. Of course, there are knock-on effects in
delayed admissions for other patients.
Every day, young people with mental health difficulties
do not receive the age-appropriate timely services and
supports they need. This causes psychological and
social damage to these young people. It has a
detrimental effect, not just on themselves, but also on
their parents, their siblings, their schools and their
communities. Of course, it reinforces the whole stigma
regarding those with mental health difficulties.

We all know what needs to be done. We have had
report after report. The problem is we have had no
action on those reports or their recommendations.
I remind the Tánaiste that to tackle this significant
issue, we need:
1. additional inpatient beds for children and young
people with mental health difficulties
2. 24-7 crisis intervention teams providing rapid
assessment for those children and young people
3. a comprehensive primary care counselling service
4. a fully staffed existing child and adolescent mental
health teams

Press Statement on Mental Health
5. to resource and support, including financially,
community and voluntary organisations working in
these areas
6. a designated leader – a tsar-type arrangement –
whose sole duty and responsibility will be to drive
the implementation of these measures to ensure
our young people get the services they deserve
and need urgently. It should be like how cancer
care services developed recently

When will we see these measures being implemented
by the Government?

***END***

Link to full Dáil Speech in Leader’s Questions and An
Tánaiste’s Response:
http://oireachtasdebates.oireachtas.ie/debates%20aut
horing/debateswebpack.nsf/takes/dail2018042600015
?opendocument

Seamus Healy T.D.
087 2802199


Today in the Dáil I raised during Leaders Questions the serious issue of our children and young people being failed by our mental health system.
Children and their parents face immense challenges to get an adequate, or indeed any, service. Due to this, many children carry those difficulties into their adult lives.
 
The position would be much worse were it not for the tremendous work done by community and voluntary organisations across the country. There are many such organisations in my own area, including the River Suir Suicide Patrol, Taxi Watch and C-SAW, the community suicide awareness workers. These all operate on a voluntary, unpaid basis and do tremendous work. There is huge frustration among these organisations, which feel alone in dealing with issues that should be properly dealt with by the public mental health service. These organisations need to be acknowledged, supported and resourced, along with financial support.
 
We are failing to provide for our young people. We need to do so urgently, it must become a Government priority. We cannot, should not, and hopefully, will not kick the can further down the road in this. They need to be implemented urgently not in the next budget but now, because this is something that is affecting young people on a minute by minute basis.
Leaders Questions 26 April 2018
Deputy Seamus Healy: Children and young people are being failed by our mental health system. For the past three months since February, young people experiencing mental health difficulties have been admitted to the paediatric ward in South Tipperary General Hospital. Today, there are three young people on the ward. There have been as many as five and their lengths of stay have been as long as eight weeks. The reason for this, as we all know, is that there are simply not enough inpatient beds for young people with mental health difficulties.
 
Admissions to the paediatric ward in South Tipperary General Hospital are totally inappropriate. Nursing staff do their best. They are kind, compassionate and caring but they are not trained to provide mental health care. Parents, usually mothers, must stay on the ward overnight to give support to their children. Of course, there are knock-on effects in delayed admissions for other patients. Every day, young people with mental health difficulties do not receive the age-appropriate timely services and supports they need. This causes psychological and social damage to these young people. It has a detrimental effect, not just on themselves, but also on their parents, their siblings, their schools and their communities. Of course, it reinforces the whole stigma regarding those with mental health difficulties. Children and their parents face immense challenges to get an adequate, or indeed any, service. Due to this, many children carry those difficulties into their adult lives.
 
We all know what needs to be done. We have had report after report. The problem is we have had no action on those reports or their recommendations. I remind the Tánaiste that to tackle this significant issue, we need additional inpatient beds for children and young people with mental health difficulties and 24-7 crisis intervention teams providing rapid assessment for those children and young people. We need a comprehensive primary care counselling service and a fully staffed existing child and adolescent mental health teams. We also need to resource and support, including financially, community and voluntary organisations working in these areas. We need a designated leader – a tsar-type arrangement – whose sole duty and responsibility will be to drive the implementation of these measures to ensure our young people get the services they deserve and need urgently. It should be like how cancer care services developed recently.
 
When will we see these measures being implemented by the Government?
 
The Tánaiste: I will ask the Minister of State, Deputy Jim Daly, to revert to the Deputy with more details on South Tipperary General Hospital after Leaders’ Questions. He is aware of some of the cases to which the Deputy referred and he has spoken to some of the parents involved.
 
Staffing and necessary skills shortages need to be addressed in the context of extra beds. Up to €55 million of additional funding has been committed for next year to develop new services, which will involve ten new beds in the Central Mental Hospital and 20 new child and adolescent mental health services, CAMHS, beds coming to the new children’s hospital. There is a recognition that there is a deficit. We are providing significant resources to address that.
 
On the broader mental health service issues, funding this year is almost €1 billion at €910 million. That is an increase of €200 million since 2012. In excess of 2,000 new posts have been approved since 2012, of which over 1,300, 66%, have been recruited with recruitment ongoing for the remainder. The appointment of 114 assistant psychologists and 20 staff grade psychologists for primary care child psychology services is ongoing. A series of actions are happening which are linked to reports which have been done. This represents incremental improvement all the time.
 
However, I am aware there are certain pressure points in different parts of the country. This is a particularly sensitive area in child and adolescent mental health services. We have seen significant increases in funding and funding commitments with the staff and beds that need to go with that. The challenge is ongoing. I will ask the Minister of State, Deputy Jim Daly, to come back to the Deputy with a more detailed answer on services in Tipperary.
 
Deputy Seamus Healy: While I thank the Tánaiste for the reply, we cannot continue to kick this can down the road. These issues must be dealt with urgently. The Tánaiste referred to recruitment. There are currently 500 psychiatric nurse vacancies in this country. The position would be much worse were it not for the tremendous work done by community and voluntary organisations across the country. There are many such organisations in my own area, including the River Suir Suicide Patrol, Taxi Watch and C-SAW, the community suicide awareness workers. These all operate on a voluntary, unpaid basis and do tremendous work. There is huge frustration among these organisations, which feel alone in dealing with issues that should be properly dealt with by the public mental health service. These organisations need to be acknowledged, supported and resourced, along with financial support.
 
We are failing to provide for our young people. We need to do so urgently, it must become a Government priority. We cannot, should not, and hopefully, will not kick the can further down the road in this. They need to be implemented urgently not in the next budget but now, because this is something that is affecting young people on a minute by minute basis.
 
 
The Tánaiste: I reaffirm to the Deputy that no one is kicking the can down the road on anything here. It is a programme of action that is already under way. The construction of a national forensic mental health complex at Portrane is progressing well and should be completed by 2020. There are other improvements such as in counselling services, including new Jigsaw sites in Cork, Dublin and Limerick, to bring a total of 13 sites nationally, and there is continued development of the community mental health teams and improved 24-7 response and liaison services are improving the contact within communities. An eating disorder care programme was launched in January 2018, which is patient-centred in care and recovery. In line with the provisions of A Vision for Change, the HSE has prioritised mental health needs for those under 18 years. We are focusing on reducing CAMHS waiting lists and improving mental health teams. There are currently 69 CAMHS teams nationally. The Minister of State, Deputy Jim Daly, is working with the HSE and officials to establish a national telephone and text line for mental health services, and the list goes on. There are a lot of things happening in this area but there is a lot more to be done, and we recognise that.

Save-Our-Acute-Hospital-Services (1).png

Clonmel, 18th February 2018- The recent approval of new developments at South Tipperary General Hospital, including a 40-bed modular unit, capital investment for a 50-bed new-construct unit and improved out-patient facilities proves once again that people power works.

 

The Save Our Acute Hospital Services Committee welcomes developments at the hospital and commends and thanks all those who played a part in this very positive and significant outcome including the public, patients and their families, hospital staff, local public representatives and Oireachtas members.

 

Were it not for the Committees project and success in stopping the transfer of all the hospitals acute services to Kilkenny and Waterford, the future developments of the hospital as announced this week would never have happened.  That success was a game-changer for the hospitals future development.

 

The knowledge that 15,000 people from all over Tipperary and indeed parts of County Waterford turned out on the streets of Clonmel and, importantly, that they would turn out again if necessary sent a message to the Health Service Executive, the Department of Health and the Government that could not be ignored.  South Tipperary General Hospital must be retained and developed.  And, again, I would like to commend those that took to the streets.  The publics continued contribution is vital to the hospital and it sets South Tipperary General apart.  

 

South Tipperary was alone in defying the powers-that-be in stopping the transfer of services and the downgrading of the hospital.  The Health Service Executive and the Department of Health succeeded in downgrading Nenagh, Ennis, Mallow, Monaghan and Roscommon.

 

The success of the Save Our Acute Hospital Services Committee established a platform for the future upgrading of the hospital, for the development of services and for a solution to the trolley crisis.

 

The Committee, working on a united basis with all stakeholders, met successive Ministers for Health including Minister James Reilly, Minister Leo Varadkar and Minister Simon Harris to impress upon them the need to solve overcrowding and to develop the hospital.

 

The Committees job now is to ensure that the promises made are implemented, and as speedily as possible, and to that effect the committee is again meeting the South West Hospital Group and South Tipperary General Hospital Management on Monday the 19th of February to progress the construction of the 40-bed modular unit.

 

The closure of St. Michael’s In-patient Psychiatric Unit at South Tipperary General Hospital by the Minister Kathleen Lynch was a huge blow to patients and their families and it is now widely accepted to have been a mistake.  South Tipperary patients must now travel to Kilkenny for in-patient treatment and North Tipperary patients to Ennis.  This is totally impractical and is leading to late admissions, inappropriate early discharges, severe over-crowding and harrowing difficulties for patients and their families who must travel to support their loved ones.

 

The Committee and Oireachtas members have already met Mr. Jim Daly, Minister with responsibility for Mental Health Services with a view to returning in-patient beds to Clonmel.  The Minister will visit the services in Clonmel on Tuesday the 20th of February to see the situation for himself and to engage with members of the Save Our Acute Hospital Services Committee, Mental Health Services Management and Oireachtas members on the issue.

 

There have been positive exchanges with the Minister and local Health Service Executive Mental Health Management recently.

 

The Committee and all stake-holders are determined that in-patient psychiatric beds will be returned to Clonmel.

 

Seamus Healy T.D. Chairperson Save Our Acute Hospital Services Committee

087 2802199

052 6121883

seamus.healy@oir.ie



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